Your West Valley News: Local news from Phoenix's West Valley communities - Sun City West, Sun City Grand, Surprise, Glendale, Peoria, El Mirage, Youngtown

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  • Antique appraiser visits Sun City West

    The Philanthropic Educational Organization Chapter CL of Sun City West will sponsor antique appraisals next month.There will be sessions from 9:30 to 11 a.m. and 1:30 to 3 p.m. Oct. 24 in the Grand Canyon Room at the Sun City West Foundation complex, 14465 R.H. Johnson Blvd,Sean Morton will be the verbal appraiser. Morton is a certified appraiser and owner of Morton Appraisals in Scottsdale, as well as a member of the Antique Appraisal Association of America,     The cost to have one item appraised is $30; $55 for two items.  Tickets may be obtained by calling Nancy Anderson at 623-584-6118; email nannek@cox.net; or Betty Schryver at 623-533-6282; email hap3good@yahoo.com for reservations.  If you would like to attend the event as an observer, tickets may be purchased at the door for $5.Raffle items and free refreshments will also be available.PEO is dedicated to the advancement of women through education.  Proceeds of this event benefit six educational projects to assist qualified women in achieving their educational goals so they may be in a financially better position to support themselves and family and provide a role model for the next generation of citizens.

  • Peoria PD letting public dispose of unwanted, unused prescription drugs

    PEORIA, Ariz. – The Police Department and the Drug Enforcement Administration will offer the community the opportunity this month to prevent drug abuse and theft by ridding their homes of potentially dangerous expired, unused and unwanted prescription drugs.The department is taking part in National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 27, at the Peoria Police Department Administration Building, 8351 W. Cinnebar Ave.The service is free and completely anonymous.Public Safety spokeswoman Amanda Jacinto said the initiative addresses a vital public safety and public health issue.“Medicines that left unused in home cabinets are highly susceptible to misuse, theft and abuse. Rates of prescription drug abuse in the U.S. are alarmingly high, as are the number of accidental poisonings and overdoses due to these drugs. Studies show that a majority of abused prescription drugs are obtained from family and friends, including from the home medicine cabinet," she stated."In addition, Americans are now advised that their usual methods for disposing of unused medicine, flushing them down the toilet or throwing them in the trash, both pose potential safety and health hazards,” Jacinto added.

  • Fundraiser features Pebble Beach trip

    Benevilla will offer a golf outing to Pebble Beach in California during its fall fundraiser, scheduled from 5 to 7 p.m. Nov. 6 at Arrowhead Lexus, 9238 W. Bell Road in Peoria.The Pebble Beach Play and Stay golf outing is valued at $6,500, according to Benevilla officials.Guests will enjoy local live music, wine tasting, refreshments from Birt’s Bistro, and other prize drawings throughout the night. Ticket holders need not be present to win.The golf outing includes a foursome at Pebble Beach Golf Links and a two-night, double occupancy stay in ocean-view rooms at The Inn at Spanish Bay.Tickets for the event and drawing may be obtained online at www.Benevilla.org or by calling 623-584-4999.

  • Latin troupe visits ASU West

    The Los Angeles-based troupe 24th Street Theatre brings its award-winning production of “La Razon Blindada (Reason Obscured)” to Arizona State University’s West campus Sept. 26-28.“La Razon Blindada” is based on the classic novel “El Quijote” by Miguel de Cervantes, Franz Kafka’s “The Truth about Sancho Panza,” and testimonies by Chicho Vargas and other political prisoners held in the 1970s at the Rawson Prison during Argentina’s dictatorship.In the play, two political prisoners, oppressed by physical and emotional abuse, find solace in meeting every Sunday at dusk to tell the story of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza. Their storytelling unravels amidst the extreme limitations imposed by their condition of inmates in a maximum security prison. It is fueled by the vital need to tell each other a story that could save them, that could transport them to a human adventure situated in the realm of imagination, where hardship and fear can’t reach them, where the most intense pain can be mitigated by the act of imagining a different reality.“We are extremely pleased to give Valley audiences the opportunity to see this important, critically acclaimed work,” said Claudia Villegas-Silva, assistant professor of Latin American studies in ASU’s New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, the core college on the West campus.“La Razon Blindada” was written and directed by Aristides Vargas, considered one of the most dynamic and influential theater artists to emerge from South America. Born in Cordoba, Argentina, he was forced into exile at age 20 by one of the bloodiest dictatorships in Latin America, and moved to Ecuador. In 1979, Vargas, along with a group of immigrant actors originally from Argentina and Spain, founded Grupo de Teatro Malayerba in Quito, Ecuador. Grupo Malayerba has since become one of the most important theater ensembles in Latin America. Over the years, Vargas’ works have expressed his ever-evolving social, political and artistic dissatisfaction with the status quo in his country. His works have been produced worldwide.The production of “La Razon Blindada” at ASU’s West campus will be performed in Spanish with supertitle translation.

  • Freedom Inn events benefit Alzheimer’s Association

    Sun City West area residents are invited to a Shred-A-Thon at Freedom Inn, 13810 W. Sandridge Drive in Sun City West from 8-11 a.m. Oct. 3.The event is free, but donations will be accepted for the Alzheimer’s Association. A shredding truck will provide on-site shredding. Assistance will be available to unload boxes of items.In addition, a book sale from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily through Oct. 24 has been set up in the main lobby of Freedom Inn. Books are priced from 75 cents, and all money raised will be donated to the Alzheimer’s Association and the Walk to End Alzheimer’s.  Donations of books for the sale also are being accepted.The annual West Valley Walk to End Alzheimer’s will be at Beardsley Park in Sun City West starting at 9 a.m. Oct 18.For information about the shredding or book sale call 623-584-2338.

  • Cast the night away at Rio Vista

    There will be night fishing from 5 to 8:30 Oct. 3 at Rio Vista Recreation Center.The city of Peoria and the Arizona Game and Fish Department are planning an evening of fishing for the whole family, and Arizona Game & Fish Department and Cabela’s staff will be on hand to assist anglers.Bait will be provided and loaner rods will be available. Limited space will be available.Register by calling 623-773-8600 and mention course number 81179. The fee is $5 per person and includes dinner and raffle prizes.

  • Program uses music to aid Alzheimer’s, dementia patients’ memory

    PHOENIX – At 87 years old, Maria still loves to dance. A resident of the Beatitudes Campus retirement community, she particularly enjoys listening to mariachi music on an iPod.Through a simple shimmy of her shoulders and rhythmic tap of her feet, Maria relives the tunes of Vicente Fernández, an artist popular in her day.But this is a rare side of Maria, who has Alzheimer’s. Only minutes before, she was staring and fidgeting while Didi Cruz, an activities coordinator for the campus’ health care center, selected her customized playlist.“Before the music she is totally asleep, not very social,” Cruz said. “And then once you put the music on she livens up, starts laughing and singing.”Maria rarely speaks before the headphones enter her ears. But this day, when asked what kind of music she likes, she answers: “Now, nothing.”Once Cruz presses play, Maria smiles.

  • Coldwell Banker names president

    Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage in Arizona has announced the company has appointed Greg Hollman as its new president.  Hollman, who has held numerous leadership roles at Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage in both Arizona and Southern California, replaces Malcolm MacEwen, who will be stepping down as president and moving into a sales capacity with the company in order to spend more time with his family.Hollman will oversee Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage’s 26 offices and 1,300 independent sales associates across Arizona. The company, which serves areas including Scottsdale/Phoenix and surrounding suburbs as well as Tucson, Prescott and Lake Havasu, is part of NRT LLC, the largest residential real estate brokerage in the nation.“With Greg’s knowledge of the Arizona market, his proven track record and his familiarity with the Coldwell Banker culture, we are confident that he will successfully lead and grow our Arizona operations,” said Jeff Culbertson, regional executive vice president of NRT’s Southwest Region. “Malcolm has served our company well and leaves a legacy that will be difficult to surpass,” added Culbertson. “It goes without saying, he will be missed.”Hollman, who has been with Coldwell Banker since 1991, started his career with Coldwell Banker Success in Arizona. In 2005, NRT acquired Coldwell Banker Success, where Hollman was made regional vice president of the Southern Arizona operations three years later. Since then, Hollman has held various leadership roles both in Arizona and Southern California.   

  • Report pans agency's relationship with community

    PHOENIX (AP) — An official appointed by a judge to monitor Maricopa County Sheriff Joe Arpaio's office in a racial-profiling case says the police agency has a distant relationship with the community that it serves. The criticism was levelled Thursday in the first quarterly report by court monitor Robert Warshaw on efforts to remedy systematic racial profiling found by a judge in the agency's traffic patrols. Warshaw says the agency doesn't appear to embrace community collaboration or the sensitivities of those affected by the agency's conduct that came under attack in the case. Tim Casey, an attorney for Arpaio's office, says Warshaw's criticism doesn't reflect the agency's experience with the community. A judge ruled in May 2013 that Arpaio's office singled out Latinos in patrols. Arpaio denies his officers have profiled people.

  • State official encourages vaccinations against flu

    PHOENIX (AP) — Arizona's top health official says it's time to get vaccinated for the flu and to encourage others to do the same. The flu season usually starts in October, and state Health Services Director Will Humble says steps now underway include monitoring reported cases and distributing distribution of vaccines. He says officials also are testing flu specimens to identify strains that are circulating and to detect potential drug resistance. Humble says the state has only one flu case reported in the past couple of weeks. He says According to the Department of Health Services, 12,000 people in Arizona were hospitalized or sickened by the flu during last year's season.

  • Glendale police searching for missing Peoria girl, 14

    GLENDALE, Ariz. -- Glendale police are searching for a missing Peoria girl, and they are asking for the public’s help in the effort.Amber Paulter, 14, was last seen walking from a friend’s house to a park in the area of the  7000 block of W. Hillcrest Blvd., according to a Glendale police spokesman. Police were notified of the missing girl around 7 p.m. Friday, Sept. 19, stated Sgt. Jay O’Neill.“Initial investigation has revealed that the missing girl, Amber Paulter of Peoria, was at a friend’s house in the area visiting when she walked to the park, telling her friend that her parents were going to pick her up there.  The parents in fact were not supposed to pick her up from the park, and that was the last time and location that she was seen. Amber has no history of this type of activity, and it is out of character for her,” O’Neill stated in a release.“Amber was last seen wearing a gray T-shirt with an unknown character on it and white shorts. She is approximately 5 feet 4 inches tall, 100 pounds, with shoulder-length brown hair and brown eyes,” O’Neill continued.Anyone with information on Paulter's whereabouts should contact Glendale Police at 623-930-3000.

  • H.S. coach suspended for taking part in team prayer

    TEMPE, Ariz. -- A Tempe high school football coach has one week remaining of a suspension that resulted from the coach instigating a team prayer.The headmaster at Tempe Preparatory Academy, Dr. David Baum, said he suspended Head Coach Tom Brittain for two weeks after Brittain instructed a player to lead a team prayer in which Brittain participated."Our adults on campus are authority figures," Baum said."If they seem to be condoning, on behalf of the school, a particular approach to religion, it has a sway on our students."Baum said that cannot be allowed, so he suspended Brittain for the prayer, which was in Show Low after a winning game.Tempe Prep is a charter school; it receives public money.

  • Latin troupe visits ASU West

    The Los Angeles-based troupe 24th Street Theatre brings its award-winning production of “La Razon Blindada (Reason Obscured)” to Arizona State University’s West campus Sept. 26-28.“La Razon Blindada” is based on the classic novel “El Quijote” by Miguel de Cervantes, Franz Kafka’s “The Truth about Sancho Panza,” and testimonies by Chicho Vargas and other political prisoners held in the 1970s at the Rawson Prison during Argentina’s dictatorship.In the play, two political prisoners, oppressed by physical and emotional abuse, find solace in meeting every Sunday at dusk to tell the story of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza. Their storytelling unravels amidst the extreme limitations imposed by their condition of inmates in a maximum security prison. It is fueled by the vital need to tell each other a story that could save them, that could transport them to a human adventure situated in the realm of imagination, where hardship and fear can’t reach them, where the most intense pain can be mitigated by the act of imagining a different reality.“We are extremely pleased to give Valley audiences the opportunity to see this important, critically acclaimed work,” said Claudia Villegas-Silva, assistant professor of Latin American studies in ASU’s New College of Interdisciplinary Arts and Sciences, the core college on the West campus.“La Razon Blindada” was written and directed by Aristides Vargas, considered one of the most dynamic and influential theater artists to emerge from South America. Born in Cordoba, Argentina, he was forced into exile at age 20 by one of the bloodiest dictatorships in Latin America, and moved to Ecuador. In 1979, Vargas, along with a group of immigrant actors originally from Argentina and Spain, founded Grupo de Teatro Malayerba in Quito, Ecuador. Grupo Malayerba has since become one of the most important theater ensembles in Latin America. Over the years, Vargas’ works have expressed his ever-evolving social, political and artistic dissatisfaction with the status quo in his country. His works have been produced worldwide.The production of “La Razon Blindada” at ASU’s West campus will be performed in Spanish with supertitle translation.

  • Surprise hosts free movie

    The City of Surprise and Coulter Nissan of Surprise present Movie Night at Surprise Stadium at 7 p.m. Sept. 27.“Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2” is rated PG.Participants should bring blankets and pillows, stretch out on the stadium grass and enjoy the free movie. Gates will open at 6 p.m.Surprise Stadium is located at 15850 N. Bullard Ave.For information, call 623-222-2000.

  • Harkins celebrates anniversary with freebies

    Harkins Theatres celebrates its 81st anniversary with gifts for moviegoers.“We are incredibly proud and honored to celebrate 81 years of entertaining Arizona,” said Dan Harkins, CEO and owner of Harkins Theatres. “The best way to commemorate the occasion is to give back to those that have made it all possible – our loyal moviegoers.”Through Sept. 25, Harkins Theatres is offering free drink upgrades on any size, regularly priced fountain drink to the next largest size, including one free refill for large and extra-large drinks.For the entire month of September, shoppers purchasing specially marked 24-packs of Coca-Cola products at select Albertsons, Bashas’, Fry’s and Safeway stores will receive a voucher for a free small drink with purchase of a Harkins Theatres movie ticket.For information and theaters near you, visit www.harkinstheatres.com.

  • Coldwell Banker names president

    Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage in Arizona has announced the company has appointed Greg Hollman as its new president.  Hollman, who has held numerous leadership roles at Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage in both Arizona and Southern California, replaces Malcolm MacEwen, who will be stepping down as president and moving into a sales capacity with the company in order to spend more time with his family.Hollman will oversee Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage’s 26 offices and 1,300 independent sales associates across Arizona. The company, which serves areas including Scottsdale/Phoenix and surrounding suburbs as well as Tucson, Prescott and Lake Havasu, is part of NRT LLC, the largest residential real estate brokerage in the nation.“With Greg’s knowledge of the Arizona market, his proven track record and his familiarity with the Coldwell Banker culture, we are confident that he will successfully lead and grow our Arizona operations,” said Jeff Culbertson, regional executive vice president of NRT’s Southwest Region. “Malcolm has served our company well and leaves a legacy that will be difficult to surpass,” added Culbertson. “It goes without saying, he will be missed.”Hollman, who has been with Coldwell Banker since 1991, started his career with Coldwell Banker Success in Arizona. In 2005, NRT acquired Coldwell Banker Success, where Hollman was made regional vice president of the Southern Arizona operations three years later. Since then, Hollman has held various leadership roles both in Arizona and Southern California.   

  • Home Depot breach affected 56M debit, credit cards

    NEW YORK (AP) — Home Depot said Thursday that a data breach that lasted for months at its stores in the U.S. and Canada affected 56 million debit and credit cards, far more than a pre-Christmas 2013 attack on Target customers. The size of the theft at Home Depot trails only that of TJX Companies' heist of 90 million records disclosed in 2007. Target's breach compromised 40 million credit and debit cards. Home Depot, the nation's largest home-improvement retailer, said that the malware used in the data breach that took place between April and September has been eliminated. It said there was no evidence that debit PIN numbers were compromised or that the breach affected stores in Mexico or customers who shopped online at Homedepot.com. It said it has also completed a "major" payment security project that provides enhanced encryption of customers' payment data in the company's U.S. stores. But unlike Target's breach, which sent the retailer's sales and profits falling as wary shoppers went elsewhere, customers seem to have stuck with Atlanta-based Home Depot. Still, the breach's ultimate cost to the company remains unknown. Greg Melich, an analyst at International Strategy & Investment Group LLC, estimates the costs will run in the several hundred million dollars, similar to Target's breach. "This is a massive breach, and a lot of people are affected," said John Kindervag, vice president and principal analyst at Forrester Research. But he added, "Home Depot is very lucky that Target happened because there is this numbness factor." Customers appear to be growing used to breaches, following a string of them this past year, including at Michaels, SuperValu and Neiman Marcus. Home Depot might have also benefited from the disclosure of the breach coming in September, months after the spring season, which is the busiest time of year for home improvement. And unlike Target, which has a myriad of competitors, analysts note that home-improvement shoppers don't have many options. Moreover, Home Depot's customer base is different from Target's. Nearly 40 percent of Home Depot's sales come from professional and contractor services. Those buyers tend to be fiercely loyal and shop a couple of times a week for supplies. Home Depot Thursday confirmed its sales-growth estimates for the fiscal year and said it expects to earn $4.54 per share in fiscal 2014, up 2 cents from its prior guidance. The company's fiscal 2014 outlook includes estimates for the cost to investigate the data breach, providing credit monitoring services to its customers, increasing call center staffing and paying legal and professional services. However, the profit guidance doesn't include potential yet-to-be determined losses related to the breach. The company said it has not yet estimated costs beyond those included in the guidance issued Thursday. Those costs could include liabilities related to payment card networks for reimbursements of credit card fraud and card reissuance costs. It could also include future civil litigation and governmental investigations and enforcement proceedings. "We apologize to our customers for the inconvenience and anxiety this has caused, and want to reassure them that they will not be liable for fraudulent charges," Home Depot's chairman and CEO, Frank Blake, said in a statement. "From the time this investigation began, our guiding principal has been to put our customers first, and we will continue to do so." The breach at Home Depot was first reported on Sept. 2 by Brian Krebs of Krebs on Security, a website that focuses on cybersecurity. Target's high-profile breach pushed banks, retailers and card companies to increase security by speeding the adoption of microchips in U.S. credit and debit cards. Supporters say chip cards are safer, because unlike magnetic strip cards that transfer a credit card number when they are swiped at a point-of-sale terminal, chip cards use a one-time code that moves between the chip and the retailer's register. The result is a transfer of data that is useless to anyone except the parties involved. Chip cards are also nearly impossible to copy, experts say. Target has been overhauling its security department and systems and is accelerating its $100 million plan to roll out chip-based credit card technology in all of its nearly 1,800 stores. Home Depot said it will be activating chip-enabled checkout terminals at all of its U.S. stores by the end of the year.

  • After record profits, airlines keep adding jobs

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The number of jobs at U.S. airlines keeps growing — although slowly — as some of them post record profits. The U.S. Department of Transportation said Thursday that the nation's passenger airlines employed the equivalent of 386,243 full-time workers in July, up 1.3 percent from the same month last year. It was the eighth straight monthly gain over year-earlier numbers. The largest employer, United Airlines, cut its work force 3.3 percent, while Delta, American, Southwest and US Airways added jobs. Two small, low-cost carriers, Spirit and Allegiant, had double-digit gains. Some regional airlines that operate shorter flights for major carriers cut jobs, including Envoy (American) and Endeavor (Delta), while others grew. The government counts two part-time employees as one full-time worker. Government bulletin: http://bit.ly/1qO0qsK

Featured columns

  • OPINION: Clinton, Bush show how it should be

    When Bill Clinton and George W. Bush announced a project jointly sponsored by their presidential libraries, news coverage focused on the style, not the substance, of the event.The Wall Street Journal said the two ex-presidents “could have been mistaken for a comedy routine.” The Associated Press reported that they “shared laughs and a buddy-like banter.”But behind the banter was a serious message. Their libraries — along with those devoted to Lyndon Johnson and George Bush 41 — are starting a leadership training program that is more needed than ever. As Clinton and Bush made clear, part of their mission is to demonstrate that Washington does not have to be a cesspool of toxic partisanship.By their presence and performance, they embodied a key dimension of effective leadership. They showed that political rivals do not have to be personal enemies. In fact, they can actually like each other, trust each other, cooperate with each other.And they can do so while disagreeing on basic issues. As Clinton noted, the Founding Fathers “never said our job was to agree on everything.” The Founders did say, however, that leaders were obligated to make a genuine effort to bridge their differences and find workable solutions.The “test of democracy” Clinton noted was the ability of rivals to find a compromise “that enables the country to keep moving forward.” As the 42nd president put it, “If you read the Constitution, it ought to be subtitled: ‘Let’s make a deal.’”

  • Master Gardener’s Mailbox: Uproot problems with wisteria, vines

    Q: I live in Sun City and I had a wisteria plant for many years, but it got woody and died. After several years I decided I would like another plant to grow on my trellis, so I purchased a pink trumpet vine. It only lasted  one season and died. When my daughter came to visit in April of this year, we went to a nursery and bought another wisteria. She put it in with fertilizer and deep-soaked it. It was growing beautifully but then all of a sudden after a few weeks, the leaves were turning yellow. Via email she told me to add Miracle Acid and osmocote pellets (plant food). So far nothing is happening, no new growth, nothing. Can you give me any suggestions? I was wondering if possibly just plain Miracle Grow would help at this time. I would appreciate any help you can give me. — Lu Chambers, Sun CityA: It is very difficult to diagnose a shrub or vine without actually looking at the plant. Nitrogen, phosphorous and iron are the only nutrients that are commonly lacking in Arizona soils. Too much of any nutrient can be toxic to plants. This is most frequently evidenced by salt burn symptoms. These symptoms include marginal browning of leaves, separated from green leaf tissue by a slender yellow halo. The browning pattern, also called necrosis, begins at the tip and proceeds to the base of the leaf along the edge of the leaf. Too much water may cause yellowing, as well as fertilizing in the summer. Chlorosis is yellowing or whitening of plant tissue due to loss or absence of chlorophyll. A new plant needs to have sun, but not too much sun according to its needs.The pink trumpet vine is a fast-growing and easy-to-cultivate vine. It does best in full sun, in nutrient-rich, well-drained soil and benefits greatly from regular applications of well-rotted compost and plenty of water in summer, but not overwatering. An established plant is tolerant of heat, strong sunlight, wind and periods of drought. It will tolerate light frost, but it is better suited to frost-free gardens. Young plants require protection from frost.For the wisteria, select a site with full sun to light shade and well-drained, deep, moist soil. Plant in spring or fall, spacing plants 10 to 15 feet apart. Dig a hole only as deep as the root ball and two to three times as wide. If your soil is in very poor condition, amend the soil you’ve removed from the hole with a small amount of compost. Otherwise don’t amend it at all. Carefully remove the plant from the container and set it in the hole. Fill the hole half full with soil, then water it well to settle the soil and eliminate air pockets. Let the water drain, then fill the remainder of hole with soil and water thoroughly. Apply a layer of compost under the plant each spring, followed by a 2-inch layer of mulch to retain moisture and control weeds. Water plants during the summer if rainfall is less than 1 inch per week. To control growth and encourage flowering, prune wisteria after flowering in early summer by cutting side shoots that arise from main stems back to 6 inches. In fall, shorten these same laterals back to two to four buds. Remove shoots arising from the base of the plant as soon as they appear. Don’t give up. Try, try again!• Melissa Stull of Litchfield Park is a member of the International Society of Arboriculture for the Western Chapter, a member of the Arboricultural Research & Education Academy, and a Maricopa County Master Gardener through the University of Arizona Cooperative Extension. Stull and her husband have owned a landscape company for 12 years and with continuing education, she is growing new ideas and ways to help our environment.Have a question for Melissa Stull? Contact her through the Daily News-Sun by emailing your question to Features Editor Brittany Martin at bmartin@yourwestvalley.com, or call 623-876-2527. Include your name and city of residence.

  • OPINION: Inheriting Sun City

    Many property transfers in Sun City, unfortunately, result from the passing of one or more parents and their descendant(s) inheriting the property. Whether the Sun City property is owned by individuals or is part of a trust, the heirs need to understand the unique nature of our community.We encourage all property owners to share with their future heirs their knowledge of our wonderful active senior adult community, and the responsibilities of ownership. In this commentary we will touch on important items that we would do well to share with our heirs and will ease the way for them during a very difficult phase upon the loss of loved ones.We are well aware that Sun City is not actually a city, rather it is an unincorporated community in Maricopa County. It is a planned community and all Sun City property owners must comply with the Declaration of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions (CC&Rs), available online at www.suncityhoa.org.These deed restrictions are recorded against each Sun City property (lot) and are enforced by the Sun City Home Owners Association (SCHOA). When acquiring a new property, whether by purchase or inheritance, the execution of a Facilities Agreement in favor of the Recreation Centers of Sun City, Inc. (RCSC) and payment of the annual homeowner fee is required.Recreation Centers of Sun City, Inc. (RCSC) is a private, non-profit corporation that owns and operates all the recreation facilities in Sun City.RCSC assesses all Sun City property owners an annual property assessment on the anniversary of the date of change in the recorded deed regardless of whether they occupy the Sun City residence or use the recreational facilities. One may access RCSC Articles of Incorporation, Bylaws and Board Policies at www.sunaz.com under the Corporate Tab.  

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Music could help with triggering memory in Alzheimer's patients

One retirement home in Phoenix is experimenting with how music can help with people struggling...

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